Around the World and Through the Lens

Visit famous sites

Bucharest, Paris of Eastern Europe

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Bucharest was known as the Paris of Eastern Europe because of her elegant buildings. However, a series of earthquakes have damaged or destroyed many of these architectural masterpieces.

Rumanian Orthodox

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Rumanian Orthodox churches abound in the land. Each one is a unique gem reflecting in its architecture the cultural influences of their many invaders.

Rumanian Fidelity

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It was a privilege to meet this elderly woman, portress of the church door. It was her duty to see that visitors were not only properly attired but reverent in their behavior. Note her missing arm: lost in a bombing in the last days of the World War II. Her joy and spirit were admirable and inspiring. Her smile was beautiful and recognizing us as American’s she spoke to us here apparently only word in English: “Hollywood”!

Fountains, Palace of Peter the Great

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My beautiful picture

Traveling incognito through Europe, Czar Peter the Great’s fascination with the elegant court of Versailles, translated itself into his creating his version on the Baltic. Peter imported craftsmen from all over Europe to come to Russia and modernize her according to European standards. Wanting windows to “peek out into Europe”, this czar sought warm water ports and turned Russia westward. However, after Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812, Russia czars returned their motherland back to its Slavic heritage.

Golden Domes

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Despite the seventy years of Russia’s Babylonian exile under communism, today many Russians have returned to their deeply religious heritage.  Although Stalin ordered the destruction of many churches and monasteries, a great number remained as silent testimonies of Faith.  

St. Petersburg Monastery

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This ancient monastery in Leningrad was used as a prison during the time infamous times of the communist regime. Peter the Great named his “window” to the Baltic: Peter’s Burg. Re-named Leningrad, it has now returned to most well-known name: St. Petersburg.

St. Petersburg

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Moscow and many cities in Russia display their faith visually in the Byzantine architectural masterpieces of their places of worship. Many of these were turned into museums or offices during the Soviets’ regime but now are being re-consecrated for religious use.

Full Moon on Domes

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A full moon illuminates the towers of one of the many cathedrals inside the Kremlin complex. Kremlin means fortress. Within that fortress, various czars at various times had cathedrals, reflecting the Faith of Holy Russia, as the inhabitants referred to their motherland. The oldest is the Cathedral of the Twelve Apostles. The Cathedral of the Assumption was built in the 15th century (the dogma of the Assumption was promulgated in 1950; it was a ratification of what was believed by all Christians, everywhere. Another famous cathedral is that of the Annunciation. Please visit this site for the Cathedral of Christ the Savior.http://www.moscow.info/orthodox-moscow/cathedral-christ-saviour.aspx

Changing of the Guard

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With mechanical precision, the Soviet soldiers march at the changing of the guard ceremony over the embalmed corpse of Vladmir Lenin.               Mandatorily worshipped as a god for seven decades, this god has fallen from his false status with the collapse of the Soviet Empire.

Lenin’s Tomb

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Churchill said that Russia’s greatest tragedy was Lenin and its second was Lenin’s death. The reason was that Lenin destroyed the old system to replace it with a new system which he eventually found severely wanting. His reading of Scientific American opened his eyes to the direction the world was heading in and he set about to change it. What he did not count on was Stalin’s lust for power. Stalin made a “god” out of Lenin and then proceeded to be this god’s Moses, issuing commandments that went absolutely contrary to Lenin’s views.